Brian Keyte

Brian Keyte

As a former Mechanical Design Draftsman and Engineer, I guess it’s not surprising that I base my work on the old “form follows function” adage. The challenge, I find, is to push beyond this to an artistic level of eliciting an emotional response from the viewer, whilst at the same time still passing the Engineer’s “fit for use” test, meaning more correctly, “appropriate” for use. To this end I use high fired porcelaneous stoneware clay for its mechanical qualities of durability, strength and impermeability and the artistic qualities one can achieve with copper and iron glazes at this temperature as well as the pure sounding ring of the vitrified body. Humankind has evolved within the natural world. I reason, therefore, that if one can utilise nature’s design rules then the product will rest easy on the eye, as that is what we are used to, whether we consciously realise it or not. This should apply to both form and colour. The form is therefore thrown with the so-called “golden mean” and/or a Fibonacci progression in mind as a guide, with the plastic nature of the clay and the intended glaze contributing to the final form. To my mind the final glaze finish should contribute to the piece in a similar way, changing and moving with the form to create a unified whole.